Thursday, November 19, 2015

Living Wills: Putting Your Refusal Into Writing (part 2 of 2)
The second probable reason for the refusal of medical treatment would be the existence of intolerable circumstances. In spite of the simplicity and tolerability of a particular life-sustaining intervention – such as a nasogastric tube (NGT) feeding, some may say no to it in the presence of an irreversible condition like a persistent vegetative state.

When viewed in this light, the life-prolonging measures may be met with completely atypical decisions. The treatment would then be perceived to lengthen the period of suffering, for both the patient and immediate family.

Even though some decisions fall effortlessly under one of the two broad categories, others just would not fit below any. Based on the circumstances present, the term "medical treatment" may involve the use of ventilation tubes (inserted into the chest or neck), the administration of antibiotics or any drug with a high probability of success. Benefit/burden decision-making in these situations could bring about different choices.

If you want certain treatments to be withheld when you're no longer able to decide for yourself, you should specify them in your living will. Numerous health care declarations or living wills contain instructions intended for doctors to deny the provision of "life-sustaining treatments" or "extraordinary care".

These directives are often difficult to interpret correctly and are less likely to be followed than those that are more detailed.

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