Monday, November 16, 2015

The Science of the Magazine Publishing Process (part 1 of 2)

In science, there always has to be a process. Science occurs in the sequence of questioning, researching, experimenting, documenting, and concluding. Like in any scientific process that uses the scientific method, magazine publishing also has its own simplified version -- production and distribution. I wouldn't call it a vicious cycle because of the way the magazine's content reinvents itself, but it is still a cycle in itself. This is proven by the continuous racks of magazine stands that fill up every week and every month.

Production: The Perfect Bind

The models, editors and photographers have done their job. Now the pages are laid out and completed. Without the right finish to the product, they will be nothing but tattered pages of words and pictures. It is time to turn these pages into a magazine.

The different sections of the magazine are printed out separately. Some are in black and white, others in full color. It all depends on the editor's preference.

After this, there are two ways by which a magazine's sections can be bound together. It could be done through saddle-stitching or perfect binding. Saddle-stitching does not use thread or any weak material. It is done by stapling the center fold within the magazine's cover page. This is often used for magazines that don't have a lot of pages and don't need heavy duty material to bind the pages together. If staple wire is too weak to put the sections together, then a spine is made by gluing one end of the pages together. This is called perfect binding and is used for thick magazines such as Vogue and Cosmopolitan.

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